Echos

“Ms Halman, can I ask you to clarify? What you’re saying does not seem to me to be make complete sense.” Sam gestured as he spoke in a warm and welcoming manner. Whenever he would refer to Ms Halman as he spoke he would open out his left hand and then, as he refered to himself, he would close his hand loosely with all four fingertips subtly directing themselves towards his chest. Ms Halman was performative as she spoke. Her hands made wide sweeping cuts through the air yet always seemed to retreat back into her chest area after an intensive flurry infront of her face. She was confused and because she was confused she was overacting to disguise her mental instability as merely the symptom of being too busy and hyperactive.
“Explain, Sam? I think I have explained perfectly; I believe that it is you who needs to learn how to listen.” Exaggerating the selfhood of those participating in conversations had become a common habit of Ms Halman as of late. It was clear why she felt the need to put emphasis on her recognition of her own selfhood and the selfhood of others – she was in crisis.
“I apologise, Ms Halman,” Sam leaned forward and his palms greeted eachother in a sloppy prayer gesture, “I am just having trouble understanding your story. It seems that, by you own admittance, you were driving your partner to Doncaster yesterday, however, when we spoke earlier, you mentioned that you car had been left at the garage for the past few days to fix an issue with its clutch. I’m confused as it cannot be both. Can you see where the confusion is coming from?” Ms Halman’s shape changed into a fortress. Her eyes narrowed and in a swift movement bare feet had slipped on her sandals. She retreated back into her sofa and stared intensely at her social worker.
“Details, Sam.” Ms Halman swatted his assertions from her personal space with a flick of her left wrist. “You are being pedantic. These minor details do not matter in the grand scheme of things.” Ms Halman softly repeated the last few words of her sentence under her breath as if she was trying fully comprehend her own words and recognise the things she was saying. She was lost. We needed to help her find herself again.

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